The spring equinox is in less than a week, and there are numerous witchy activities you can do to take advantage of this perfect time of year. Obviously it’s fun to get into the traditional practices of springtime magic, but what about those of us who incorporate ancestral reverence in our craft? If you want to honor your ancestors during the spring equinox, a few of these ideas may be useful.

Plants, obviously

Plant-matter is often used in witchcraft — especially in ritual incenses, spell powders and herbal baths. When it comes to ancestor veneration, that’s no different. A wide-held belief is that placing white flowers around your home may attract spirits — and the more aromatic they are, the better. If you’re creating an ancestral offering on the spring equinox, you can surround your altar with beautiful white flowers of your choosing, or you can choose specific flowers which you know to be your ancestors’ favorites.

Plants believed to attract spirits:

  • Honeysuckle
  • Roses
  • Lily of the Valley
  • Jasmine

You can plant some of these flowers around your garden to turn the area into a sort of springtime altar to honor your ancestors and to cast spells. If you don’t want to plant and grow these flowers, you can buy floral arrangements instead — though growing your own gives you more a connection to them.

Dumbsupper Alternative

Springtime brings us outdoors for a number of reasons — cooking outdoors being one of them. Why not have a dumb supper with your ancestors on the spring equinox, featuring a meal prepared outdoors among the spring foliage and fresh air? An offering of savory and sweet foods to celebrate the changing season is a fun and festive way to honor your ancestors on this important day.

Grave Decoration

Visit the grave of an ancestor that you hold dear, and clean or decorate their grave to celebrate the changing of the seasons. Make sure this is allowed where you live, however. Floral arrangements, statues and other offerings can be left at gravestones if done tastefully. This is actually a popular way to give offerings to ancestors. In the south we call it “decoration day,” in fact.